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Calum and Jess Donald's Summer Wine, a Falcon 24, Sail #1798, Auckland (ex Hastings), New Zealand (updated April 17, 2018/NOTE - video postscript)  
   

July 25, 2013. Calum and Jess have checked in as the new owner of Summer Wine, formerly owned by Giles Grimston. Click here to go Summer Wine when Giles had her.

Here is Calum's and Jess's email (minor edits), and some photos.

Hello!

I am sorry for how long it has for us to get in touch. We are the proud new owners of Summer Wine :) previously owned by Giles Grimston.

We've had a great few months on her with day sails in the Bay but have not ventured further yet.

After
Before

We just had her out of the water for a water blast (needed it! see photo avove right) and a repaint of the topsides and anti foul...unfortunately the new white waterline paint turned out to be black, and as she was going in the water first thing in the morning a quick decision was made…and so she now has a slightly unusual red on black colour scheme!

We are planning on doing a bit of work in the cabin to get her camp-aboard/live-aboard, and then hopefully going to sail her up to the Bay of Islands end of next summer.

We had a few questions about projects on the go that I thought you or others may have had experience with in the past?

1) I'm planning to install an echo sounder and, to avoid unnecessary hull holes,  was going to simply mount in epoxy for an in hull job. I wanted to check if Falcons are solid grp, not sandwich construction? and any suggestions for places to mount it? I noticed what I think is a previous transducer in hull mount (wood and plastic cylinder) in the port main cabin locker unfortunately won't fit the transducer I have.

2) I very foolishly lost the main halyard… accident with rope round prop...urgent cutting….followed by halyard too short…followed by mouse to halyard attachment breaking....To cut a long story short I was young and foolish! And now I have a newly bought halyard but no mouse inside the mast… I've re-run a halyard on another boat in the past by using a piece of string and a couple of nuts as weights and then just playing around till it fell out of the right hole. Tried this technique a few days ago with no success so will retry with a better bosuns chair to give me more comfort and therefore patience - found a solid block of wood that Giles must have made into a seat that looks far more comfortable than the rope harness I was hanging/suffocating in!. Wondered if any suggestions/ or knowledge specific to the boat/mast? I think it is the original/standard Falcon mast.

3) During the hull repaint we found a slightly concerning hull defect…an exposed keel bolt. It was on the port side forward end. I had a few others in the yard take a look and decided to knock out the loose material, let it dry well and then resealed it with marine filler which seemed to be the material that was already there. I was going to use epoxy but someone advised this would make inspecting keel bolts at a later date difficult.

The nut and small bit of bolt I could see looked in good condition, I guess they may have been stainless? One thought was that it would be a good opportunity to take the keel bolts out and fully inspect but unfortunately just didn't have the time on this lift.

I wondered if you had ever had similar experiences/ thoughts on the gravity of the situation? I've never had keel bolts before… I wondered if the cause had been someone whilst the keel bolts were tightened from inside if the twisting action on the nut at the bottom/ or the bolt moving through had simply broken the filler that was there in the beginning?

Anyway, we are looking forward to a few days off work next week to take her out and see how she fairs without a ton of sea life attached to her bum!

Best wishes

Calum and Jess

Webmaster Note: We asked Alan Mountford, who is doing a major restoration on his Falcon 24, Blue Gum, in Queensland, Australia for some help regarding questions about hull construction, keel bolts, depth sounder/Location, and log. Click here to see his interesting reply.

Regarding the matter of reeving internal halyards typing reeving halyards in Google Search will produce a number of approaches - click here to see one courtesy of Alma Yachts

********************************

July 25, 2013. Giles Grimston read the post we made above and has come back with the following advice to Calum and Jess (minor edits)

Morning stranger. I trust you are well.

I have just read the Summer Wine stuff and can give you some info.

Having lost one halyard on her you need to remove the fairlead housing at the base of the mast. You cannot feed unless you do this. Drill out about 8 pop rivets and it pops out. Feed from the top and use a coat hanger to get the end out when it reaches the deck. Replace with Monel rivets from Bunnings.

The keel bolts except the forward one came out for inspection and were greased on return 18 months ago. The surveyor took photographs for his files (John Burns). They are all fine to do except the very front one. Be gentle when undoing use a nut from one of the others as a lock nut. If in doubt check with others.

The front one was always a mystery and I can shed no light except that it needed tightening occasionally. Due to the precarious nature it is impossible to get enough purchase on it to over tighten.

Happy sailing. She is lovely and with a clean bum you will really get the best out of her.

Kind regards
Giles

********************************

July 29, 2013. With a little help from friends near and far Summer Wine is sailing again. Here's Calum's update and proof (minor edits)

Hi Ron,

Thanks to you and everyone for all the great advice!

Have successfully reweaved the halyard, started off trying to drill out the mast fitting as Giles suggested but unfortunately my rather cheap drill bits just wernt up to it, so after 2 broken bits and barley a scratch on the rivet I headed up the mast to try my patience lowering the weight into the mast fitting.

An hour later and no joy dropping into i guess a fairly small entrance to the fitting my mate at the bottom realised he could see it through a higher fitting in the mast, which was a direct sight into the mast instead of blocked off by the fitting. He fished the mouse through the direct fitting using the coathanger technique, then threaded it through the coat hanger and put the coathanger and weighted string back inside the mast pushing it accross so now the line was held against the correct side of the mast, 2 minutes later I heard an excited noise from the deck as the line dropped into sight!

Went out for a very gentle sail today in arround 5 knots of breeze, but with great sun and a clean hull it was very exciting to be out on the water :)

Even sent a little dingy photo party out to get an on water snap

Thanks again for everyone's help

Be in touch soon

Cal

 

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April 17, 2018. In response to a webmaster follow up we got the following update from Cal. And, in keeping with website staff's efforts to familiarize readers with our sailing areas, below his email and postscript are Google 'charts' of of Summer Wine's home waters.

Hi Ron

Yes all is great! Keep meaning to update you...will do so properly soon but for now the brief update is she has moved to Auckland with us, kept in Okahu Bay just opposite Kelly Tarltons Aquarium.

She is enjoying day sails and overnighters in the Hauraki Gulf :)

Cal

Postscript

Forgot to mention she has also been featured In the award winning short film- ‘the Specialist’

https://youtu.be/HGANPLJdKyY

Proper update soon...

Cal

Click here for a larger image

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